Repairs Every New Homebuyer Should Make

[fbshare type=”button”][pinterest count=”horizontal”]

 

Moving can be time consuming… well “life” consuming.  The last thing you need to be worried about is remembering what to check/repair in your new home.  Here’s a great list of reminders to help you down the road:

content_MovingMove-In Week

  • Make it a point to turn on all of your major appliances and let them run for a complete cycle, especially if your home is newly built to look for leaks.
  • Be sure to read your warranty — don’t wait until an emergency to start familiarizing yourself with your legal rights and responsibilities.

45 Days Later

  • Change the filter on your HVAC system, and vacuum out the air intake vents. Capturing dirt and dust with the right filter can go a long way toward reducing dust.

Six Months Later

  • During summer months, keep an eye out for invasive animals like squirrels, birds and wasps. These pests look for loose soffits and buckled siding as a way to get into your home.
  • Twice a year in the summer and fall, inspect the exterior of your house to make sure rainwater is draining properly.
  • Landscaping should be negatively graded away from the house.
  • Each winter, check to make sure that your pipes are properly insulated against freezing.

Every Year

  • Inspect your roof or have a professional roofer conduct an inspection. Look for missing shingles, gaps in the flashing around chimneys and other hazards. Indoors, check your ceiling for water spots.

Every Two Years

  • Have a professional HVAC contractor inspect your furnace, air conditioner and hot water heater.
  • Inspect exterior paint and touch up as needed.

Posted on October 16, 2013 at 4:18 pm
Dempsey and Phelps | Category: Bend Homes, Buying a Home, Home Sales, Real Estate, Second Homes, Vacation Homes | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

NAR Study Shows There’s Real Value in Owning a Home

If your home is under water, maybe you’ve questioned the value of continued ownership. This article may help ease your concerns.
Is there value in owning a home? The recently released 2010 National Association of REALTORS® Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers brings us some promising results. Today homeowners are living in their homes longer, and after several years of price declines, are seeing rises in home equity gains.
It was only earlier this decade that so many buyers jumped on the investment bandwagon. They bought and sold within incredibly short time frames, and walked away with profits. But as the booms busted, many sellers found they had bought at the top of the market and as prices corrected, they lost more than just dollars. Foreclosure rates skyrocketed. Historically, however, homeownership is a long term investment, and one that brings many rewards.
“Sellers who purchased at the top of the market and had to sell in a short time frame were hurt by the price correction, but the vast majority who are able to stay for a normal period of home ownership generally built enough equity to make a trade-up purchase,” NAR 2010 President Vicki Cox Golder said. “Despite swings in the housing market in recent years, the fact is most long-term owners see healthy gains in the value of their property.”

Read more at realtytimes.com

Posted on November 15, 2010 at 6:59 am
Dempsey and Phelps | Category: Real Estate | Tagged , , , , ,

Social Benefits of Homeownership

Interesting take on benefits of homeownership other than the most obvious.

Amplify’d from www.realtor.org
NAR Research recently released a report on The Social Benefits of Homeownership and Stable Housing. We present highlights from that report below.

The economic benefits of the housing market and homeownership are immense and well documented. The housing sector directly accounted for approximately 14 percent of total economic activity in 2009. Less than half of Americans owned their homes at the beginning of the 20th century. Homeownership remained fairly stable until the onset of the Great Depression. In the subsequent two decades, the homeownership rate rose dramatically, easily topping 60 percent by 1960. Modest gains were made during the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. However, during the early 1990s, the homeownership rate once again trended upward as mortgage rates steadily declined and the economy expanded at rates not experienced in many years. By 2004, 69 percent of Americans owned their homes – a record high. The homeownership rate has since declined to 66.9 percent as of the second quarter 2010. Still, that figure indicates that two thirds of U.S. households own their own home. (For more information, visit www.census.gov.)

For more information
The complete report, The Social Benefits of Homeownership and Stable Housing, is available at www.realtor.org. The report contains a complete listing of research studies and sources for the data and conclusions presented.

Read more at www.realtor.org

 

Posted on October 18, 2010 at 6:46 am
Dempsey and Phelps | Category: Real Estate | Tagged , , , ,